The Latest: US fossil fuel official tours Wyoming coal sites

  • Aug 22, 2019
  • WVVA

CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — The Latest on Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy Steven Winberg’s visit to Wyoming (all times local):

The U.S. government official who oversees research involving fossil fuels says it’s not too late for new technology to help the coal industry.

Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy Steven Winberg said Thursday in Cheyenne that some technologies to make products from carbon dioxide emissions could be marketable within a couple years.

Winberg is touring Wyoming at a crucial time for the coal-producing state. Financial troubles have shut down two huge open-pit mines in the Powder River Basin.

Winberg’s trip focuses on fossil fuel technologies, including ways to keep greenhouse gases from entering the atmosphere from coal-fired power plants. Winberg visited a carbon-capture test facility at a coal-fired power plant and toured a coal mine in the Gillette area.

He plans to visit a University of Wyoming research center Friday.

The U.S. government official who oversees research into fossil fuel technology is visiting Wyoming at a crucial time for the coal-mining state.

Financial troubles have shut down two huge open-pit mines in the Powder River Basin, the top U.S. coal producing-region.

About 700 people at the Eagle Butte and Belle Ayr mines found themselves out of work when the mines’ owner, Milton, West Virginia-based Blackjewel LLC, filed for bankruptcy July 1.

U.S. Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy Steven Winberg is touring Wyoming while federal officials consider whether to approve a purchase deal that could allow the mines to reopen.

Winberg’s tour is focused on fossil fuel technologies, including carbon capture. He is visiting research labs at a coal-fired power plant near Gillette and at the University of Wyoming in Laramie.

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