Scott Morrison warned on 'cherry-picking' $35 billion climate cost

  • Apr 22, 2019
  • Sydney Morning Herald

The election fight on climate change has sparked warnings against “misleading” voters about the cost of cutting greenhouse gas emissions, as an independent researcher repudiates Coalition claims of a $35 billion hit from Labor policies.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison has been accused of “cherry-picking” numbers in the escalating row over the competing pledges on climate, as he prepares to release new estimates of the economic impact of the Labor carbon target.

But the Coalition is challenging Opposition Leader Bill Shorten to “come clean” about the way manufacturers, steelmakers, gas exporters and others will have to meet his target of reducing emissions by 45 per cent by 2030 in sectors that employ thousands of workers.

Scott Morrison and Bill Shorten have clashed over climate policy.Credit:Dominic Lorrimer/Alex Ellinghausen

Labor is seeking to shift the election debate to wages policy after the lull in the campaign over Easter, while the Coalition wants to keep the focus on the economy with the imminent release of its costings of the Labor climate change pledge.

The election fight on climate change has sparked warnings against “misleading” voters about the cost of cutting greenhouse gas emissions, as an independent researcher repudiates Coalition claims of a $35 billion hit from Labor policies.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison has been accused of “cherry-picking” numbers in the escalating row over the competing pledges on climate, as he prepares to release new estimates of the economic impact of the Labor carbon target.

But the Coalition is challenging Opposition Leader Bill Shorten to “come clean” about the way manufacturers, steelmakers, gas exporters and others will have to meet his target of reducing emissions by 45 per cent by 2030 in sectors that employ thousands of workers.

Scott Morrison and Bill Shorten have clashed over climate policy.Credit:Dominic Lorrimer/Alex Ellinghausen

Labor is seeking to shift the election debate to wages policy after the lull in the campaign over Easter, while the Coalition wants to keep the focus on the economy with the imminent release of its costings of the Labor climate change pledge.

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